Biological Chemistry

Seth Margolis

Seth Margolis

Synapses are specialized cell-cell junctions which connect individual neurons together and are the sites of transmission of information between neurons. While the molecular mechanisms which promote synapse formation have been a subject of intense investigation, little is known about the molecular mechanismsthat limit synapse formation so that synapses form at the right time and place and in the correct numbers. We hypothesize that this step in the refinement of synaptic formation is crucial for the fine-tuning of neuronal connectivity and that signaling networks which limit synaps

Natasha Zachara

Natasha Zachara

The dynamic modification of intracellular proteins by monosaccharides of O-linked N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) plays key roles in cellular physiology and disease progression. Underpinning this observation are some 3000 O-GlcNAc-modified proteins that regulate cellular pathways such as epigenetics, gene expression, translation, protein degradation, signal transduction, mitochondrial bioenergetics, the cell cycle and protein localization.

Karen Reddy

Karen Reddy

Understanding the cell biology of genomes and how nuclear architecture controls gene expression is necessary to truly understand biological processes such as development and disease. Although sequencing of the genome and comparative genome analysis have yielded insights into the regulation and dis-regulation of genetic information, these efforts shed little light into how genomes actually work in vivo. The impact of architectural and cellular organization of genomes on gene activity is a next step to unlocking genetic and epigenetic mechanisms in development and disease.

Daniel Raben

Daniel Raben

A major effort in our laboratory is focused on understanding the biochemistry and chemistry underlying the molecular aspects involved in regulating lipid metabolizing signaling enzymes and the physiological roles of this regulation. Control of lipid metabolizing enzymes involves the modulation of two key parameters; their sub-cellular distribution and their intrinsic enzymatic activity. Our studies have concentrated on three families of lipid-metabolizing signaling enzymes: diacylglycerol kinases, phospholipases D, and phospholipases C.

Akhilesh Pandey

Akhilesh Pandey

ThePandey Lab is a systems biology lab that integrates molecular and cellular biology, genomics, proteomics and bioinformatics.   Signal Transduction and Cancer Biology: Cell surface receptors transmit signals to the interior of the cell upon binding to aligand. We have cloned a number of signaling molecules that are involved in signal transduction through receptor tyrosinekinases and cytokine receptors.

BCMB students currently in the lab:

Tamara O'Connor

Tamara O'Connor

The outcome of most parasitic relationships is decided by an elaborate series of events involving hundreds of proteins. Understanding this interaction requires the analysis of the molecular mechanisms operating in both organisms and the causal relationships acting at the interface between them. The O’Connor lab studies the molecular basis of infectious disease using Legionella pneumophila pathogenesis as a model system.

Paul Watkins

Paul Watkins

My laboratory's primary interest is fatty acid metabolism in inherited metabolic diseases and in cancer. X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (XALD) and peroxisomal biogenesis disorders are characterized biochemically by having excess very long-chain fatty acids (VLCFA, containing 26 or more carbons) in tissue lipids. High VLCFA levels are thought to contribute to the neurologic deficits and other pathophysiologic processes seen in these diseases.

BCMB students currently in the lab:

Mollie K. Meffert

Mollie K. Meffert

Our laboratory is particularly interested in how changes in synaptic activity are converted into long-term alterations in the function and connectivity of neurons through the modulation of gene expression.  Fundamental questions in gene expression of interest to the lab include: Why are changes in gene expression required for enduring alterations in synaptic strength, such as during learning, development, or disease? What pathways exist to generate distinct subcellular changes in gene expression, for example to regulate individual synapse protein composition and input specificity?

BCMB students currently in the lab:

Joel L. Pomerantz

Joel L. Pomerantz

My laboratory is interested in the molecular mechanisms by which cells interpret signals from their environment that instruct them to proliferate, differentiate, or die by apoptosis. This process is of fundamental importance in the development and function of the immune system. The dysregulation of signal transduction underlies many diseases of the immune system including immunodeficiencies, autoimmunity, and cancers derived from immune cells.

BCMB students currently in the lab:

Michael Wolfgang

Michael Wolfgang

The research in the Wolfgang laboratory utilizes biochemistry and molecular genetics to understand the molecular mechanisms used to sense and respond to nutritional/metabolic cues under various physiological and pathophysiological circumstances.  They are particularly interested in deciphering the roles of unexplored metabolic enzymes/pathways and determining novel roles of canonical metabolic pathways in cells and tissues that have been largely ignored by the metabolic community.  This includes cells in the nervous system and immune system as well as more classical metabolic mode

BCMB students currently in the lab:

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