Neuroscience

Christopher J. Potter

Christopher J. Potter

King-Wai Yau

King-Wai Yau

Our laboratory is interested in the area of sensory transduction: specifically visual and olfactory transductions, which are the processes by which the senses of vision and olfaction are initiated. These two processes have interesting similarities and differences. Vision can in turn be distinguished into image vision and non-image vision. Image vision is the conventional vision by which we view objects and track their motions. Non-image vision is the subconscious vision for detecting the general luminance in the ambience.

BCMB students currently in the lab:

Paul Worley

Paul Worley

The focus of our research is to identify mechanisms of protein synthesis-dependent neuronal plasticity. The approach uses differential cloning techniques to identify mRNAs that are rapidly induced in neurons by synaptic activity. Classical studies established that rapid, de novo protein synthesis is required for long-term memory, and we developed animal models that maximize the induction of candiate genes that are involved in this response. Over the past several years, we have examined the composition and contribution of these genes to neuronal function.

BCMB students currently in the lab:

Shanthini Sockanathan

Shanthini Sockanathan

The nervous system consists of a great variety of neurons and glia that together form the components and circuits necessary for nervous system function. Neuronal and glial diversity are generated through a series of highly orchestrated events that control cell numbers, subtype identity, cell morphology and axonal projection patterns.  Although glial cells remain proliferative throughout life, the number of neurons remains largely finite, with the exception of small pockets of adult neurogenesis in the brain.

BCMB students currently in the lab:

Jonathan Pevsner

Jonathan Pevsner

The Pevsner lab studies the molecular basis of childhood brain disorders. We focus on chromosomal abnormalities (measured with single nucleotide polymorphism or SNP arrays) as well as genetic variants (measured using whole genome, whole exome, or targeted sequencing). The lab specializes in bioinformatics approaches: we use computational tools to make progress in understanding disease, and we write software programs to facilitate our research.

BCMB students currently in the lab:

Solomon H. Snyder

Solomon H. Snyder

Neurotransmitters, Second Messengers and Drug Action in the Nervous System

BCMB students currently in the lab:

Solange Brown

Solange Brown

?Our research takes a bottom-up approach to understanding how the neural circuits of this massively interconnected network of neurons are functionally organized and how dysfunction in these circuits contributes to neurodegenerative diseases like amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and neuropsychiatric disorders including autism and schizophrenia.  Approaches We use a variety of techniques to address these questions including: 1.

BCMB students currently in the lab:

Alex Kolodkin

Alex Kolodkin

Research in my laboratory is focused on understanding how neuronal connectivity is established during development.  Our work investigates the function of extrinsic guidance cues and their receptors on axonal guidance, dendritic morphology, and synapse formation and function.  For several years we have investigated how neural circuits are formed and maintained through the action of guidance cues that include semaphorin proteins, their classical plexin and neuropilin receptors, and also novel receptors.  We employ a cross phylogenetic approach, using both invertebrate and verte

BCMB students currently in the lab:

Richard Huganir

Richard Huganir

Neurotransmitter receptors mediate signal transduction at the postsynaptic membrane of synaptic connections between neurons in the nervous system. We have been studying the molecular mechanisms in the regulation of neurotransmitter receptor function. Recently we have focused on glutamate receptors, the major excitatory receptors in the brain. Glutamate receptors can be divided into two major classes: AMPA and NMDA receptors. AMPA receptors mediate rapid excitatory synaptic transmission while NMDA receptors play important roles in neuronal plasticity and development.

Loyal Goff

Loyal Goff

The goal of my research program is to answer a fundamental biological question: how is the genome properly interpreted to coordinate the diversity of cell types observed during neuronal development? We are focused on the acquisition of specific cellular identities in neuronal development and identifying the molecular determinants responsible for proper brain development.

BCMB students currently in the lab:

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