Jun Liu

Our primary research interest lies at the interface between chemistry, biology and medicine. We seek to discover new chemical ligands to modulate signaling pathways and cellular processes of interest by conducting high-throughput screening of chemical libraries we generate or...

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Andrew Feinberg

Understanding how the information in the genome is utilized is one of the central questions in modern biology. It has become clear that a critical level of gene regulation occurs through the chemical modification of both the DNA itself...

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Dominique Frueh

Non-ribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) are large enzymatic systems responsible for the biosynthesis of a wealth of secondary metabolites, many of which are used by pharmaceutical scientists to produce drugs such as antibiotics or anticancer agents. To synthesize all of...

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Andrew Holland

Molecular mechanisms underlying accurate chromosome segregation Since Flemming introduced the term “mitosis” over 100 years ago, a challenge has been to understand how cells divide and faithfully transmit chromosomes at each cell division. Errors in the distribution of chromosomes...

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Takanari Inoue

Research Focus Our research focuses on “synthetic cell biology” to dissect and reconstitute intricate signaling networks. In particular, we investigate positive-feedback mechanisms underlying the initiation of neutrophil chemotaxis (known as a symmetry breaking process), as well as spatio-temporally dynamic...

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James C. Barrow

The research group is a laboratory focused on medicinal chemistry, primarilyaddressing diseases of neurodevelopment such as schizophrenia. Biological activity and structure-based drug design are used to drive chemistry target selection, and we are developing synthetic methods to efficiently prepare...

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James M. Berger

Research Interests: My laboratory’s research is focused on understanding how multi-subunit assemblies use ATP for overcoming topological challenges within the chromosome and controlling the flow of genetic information. We are particularly interested in developing mechanistic models that explain how...

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Sean Taverna

Eukaryotic cells package their genomes in the form of chromatin, which is comprised of histone proteins and DNA. Modification of chromatin by chemical marks such as methylation and acetylation affects how cellular machineries interpret the genome. The Taverna laboratory...

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Michael Wolfgang

The research in the Wolfgang laboratory utilizes biochemistry and molecular genetics to understand the molecular mechanisms used to sense and respond to nutritional/metabolic cues under various physiological and pathophysiological circumstances. They are particularly interested in deciphering the roles of...

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Douglas Robinson

Multi-cellular living organisms grow from single cells into multicellular, complex systems composed of highly diverse cell-types organized into tissues, which in turn form organs and organ systems. To organize and maintain this complex architecture, the organism must undergo constant...

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